Norway: nature, history and accessibility

When we talk about accessibility, Northern Europe has nothing to learn. And Norway doesn’t except, luckily! Indeed, this fascinating country, rich in natural beauty and history, has always cared a lot about disabled people needs. Then, if you’re thinking about visiting it, please note that, apart from a little bit of caution linked to the climate (during winter, snow and ice are the standard and temperatures aren’t exactly mild), you can focus on holiday and leave worries at home! But let’s immediately start our “virtual tour”.

As always, my first advice, if you want to spend a holiday in Norway, is to plan it well in advance. The best time to fully enjoy the beauty of Norway goes from late spring to summer, when temperature is mild and, then, going about is more pleasant. Because there’s plenty of things to see in Norway!

Norway - The northern lights seen from the Lofoten islands

The northern lights seen from the Lofoten islands

The most comfortable and fast way to reach Norway from Italy, of course, is airplane: contact well in advance the airline you’ll choose to request the assistance you need and avoid unpleasant glitches during the flight. Once you’ve reached your destination, you’ll realize that, as in all the Northern Europe countries, also in Norway accessibility is very important, not only in Oslo and in the other main cities, but also in national parks and in the fjords region. Public transport and stops are, for the overwhelming majority, fully accessible to people with disability, not just with a motoric one.

Norway - The Royal Palace in Oslo

Oslo, the Royal Palace

Norway - Oslo, Vigeland Park

Oslo, Vigeland Park

And what about museums, monuments and public places? Norway has been very committed, throughout the years, to make its most important monuments and museums as accessible as possible, since they attract tourists from all around the world. In Oslo, for instance, the Royal Palace, built in the first half of the nineteenth century, today is one of the most accessible in the world. The same is valid for the most well-known museums in the city, from the Viking one to that devoted to the Peace Nobel Prize history, plus the magnificent Opera House and the National Theatre or the suggestive Vigeland Park (also known as “sculptures’ park”), devoted the works of the artist Gustav Vigeland. Shops and public places are, generally, accessible also to who uses a wheelchair: there are still some issues left for the oldest ones, that sometimes have stairs or narrow spaces in their interior parts.

Do you prefer the beauty of nature? Take the chance to do a cruise in the fjords region, in the South of Norway, or to enjoy the breath-taking landscapes of the Lofoten islands, very close to the Polar Arctic Circle. Everything will be fully accessible and safe, as you can see in this video about the fjords in the Rogaland area.

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